Requiem for a Kool-Aid Wino: Why is Richard Brautigan, the Original George Saunders, Still Ignored?

by Mark Alvarez

My old San Francisco neighborhood has two hearts: Portsmouth Square and Washington Square. While the former is something whose name is unrecognized even by many San Franciscans, part of the vagueness they thrust upon Chinatown–despite being the spot where the state of California was founded–the latter is one of the most well-loved public spaces in the City, a tree-lined green slope decompressing North Beach density, perfect for absorbing the between-fog sun.
More Requiem for a Kool-Aid Wino: Why is Richard Brautigan, the Original George Saunders, Still Ignored?

Dana Diehl Talks About TV Girls and What She Loves in Reality TV

by Courtney Brooks

Author Dana Diehl has a complicated obsession with reality TV shows, particularly those one can find on TLC. Diehl’s fascination with the lives and struggles of the characters she watches on shows such as Dance Moms, Cake Boss, Sister Wives, The Bachelor, and House Hunters made way for the stories in her new chapbook, TV Girls. … More Dana Diehl Talks About TV Girls and What She Loves in Reality TV

Decolonizing Nonfiction: What it Means to Write in an ‘American Invention’

NonfictionNOW featured a slew of diverse writers and panels this year. During the panel “Decolonizing Nonfiction,” four Southeast Asian authors brought a perspective to nonfiction that I had not yet seen as a young, Latina woman growing up in the Southwestern United States. They began the panel by introducing which parts of Southeast Asia they had come from so that the audience could understand the circumstances that had informed their writing. I found it interesting as writers Daryll Delgado, Lawrence LacambraYpil, Wilfredo Pascual, and Ruihe Zhang sat before an audience of predominantly white writers and explained their journey into the world of nonfiction–an “American invention,” as Zhang calls is. … More Decolonizing Nonfiction: What it Means to Write in an ‘American Invention’

NFN2018: “Sub/urban Environmental Writing”

Sub/urban environmental writing is not simply blurry-eyed nostalgia for a greener past, spewing anger for a potentially bleak future, or ruminating guiltily over our less-than-conscientious, human activities. It can be humorous, charming, and contemporary. And these five, accomplished authors and activists are calling all writers to action. … More NFN2018: “Sub/urban Environmental Writing”

Lands Shift and So Should Poems: An Interview with Jake Skeets

By Margarita Cruz Jake Skeets (Diné) is from the Navajo Nation. He received an MFA at the Institute of American Indian Arts. His work has appeared in Word Riot, Connotation Press, The Blueshift Journal, and elsewhere, and he recently founded Cloudthroat, an online publication of Indigenous art and poetics. He is the winner of the 2018 … More Lands Shift and So Should Poems: An Interview with Jake Skeets

Nostalgia for the Present: An Interview with Jared Harél

By Michael Buckius In his award-winning debut poetry collection Go Because I Love You, Jared Harél dives into themes of nostalgia, childhood, parenting and the trauma of the past. His writing is sometimes matter-of-fact and sometimes surreal, giving insights into what it means to be father and husband, the legacies of past and present, and how … More Nostalgia for the Present: An Interview with Jared Harél

Indebted to Our Digitality: an Interview with Mike Oliphant

By Jamie Shrewsbury

In our most recent issue, we hosted the Gas Station Prize, celebrating and seeking out hybrid forms. The contest’s winner, Mike Oliphant’s “Medium Warp: Excerpt’s of a Digital Consciousness,” inhabits shapes and forms present in code and web landscapes to explore the boundaries and relationships present in a digital consciousness. … More Indebted to Our Digitality: an Interview with Mike Oliphant